ARTISTS

DAVID GUY MEASURES

  • Untitled - reference: 17.08.1986.JPG Untitled - reference: 17.08.1986.JPG
  • Pheasant - reference: 23.03.2008.JPG Pheasant - reference: 23.03.2008.JPG
  • Untitled - reference: 26bcrop.02.2000.JPG Untitled - reference: 26bcrop.02.2000.JPG
  • Untitled - reference: 24.07.1985.JPG Untitled - reference: 24.07.1985.JPG
  • Untitled - reference: 28.4.79.JPG Untitled - reference: 28.4.79.JPG
  • Untitled - reference: 14.05.2008.JPG Untitled - reference: 14.05.2008.JPG
  • Hares - reference: 14.09.2008.JPG Hares - reference: 14.09.2008.JPG
  • Hares - reference: 16.09.07.JPG Hares - reference: 16.09.07.JPG
  • Hares - reference: 20+04.2008.JPG Hares - reference: 20+04.2008.JPG
  • Hares - reference: 20.09.2007.JPG Hares - reference: 20.09.2007.JPG
  • Hare - reference: DSCF3455.JPG Hare - reference: DSCF3455.JPG
  • Butterfly - reference: 22.04,2000.JPG Butterfly - reference: 22.04,2000.JPG
  • Untitled - reference: 28.05.1970.JPG Untitled - reference: 28.05.1970.JPG
  • Untitled - reference: 28.09.2006.JPG Untitled - reference: 28.09.2006.JPG
  • Untitled - reference: 29.08.96.JPG Untitled - reference: 29.08.96.JPG
  • Untitled - reference: 30.09.1995.JPG Untitled - reference: 30.09.1995.JPG
  • Untitled - reference: 30.6.2000.JPG Untitled - reference: 30.6.2000.JPG
  • Winter Landscape - reference: 1977.JPG Winter Landscape - reference: 1977.JPG
  • Common Seals - reference: DSC_2518.JPG Common Seals - reference: DSC_2518.JPG
     

Quoting from Julian Spalding's obituary in the Guardian, "David lives in every flick of his brush, finger-tip, colour loaded nail!" David's sketches and paintings are his response to what he sees, and experiences, and those of the creatures he happens to see by chance, or those he sets out to see. His note-books / sketch-books, are full of drawings and written notes as a result of his quest to know more about the creatures, the wild-life, wherever he went. But to be able to achieve this he followed and observed his creatures as he went about his daily life, therefore returning to the same spot time and time again. In this he was not interested in making "a painting" — wildlife moves, so his drawings are often gestural marks — maybe half a head, twitching ears of a hare, a beady eye looking at him, but always full of the character of the bird, animal, insect. Speed and accuracy of seeing and drawing are the essence of the activity. Whereas his watercolours of Derbyshire woodland in the sunset, hazy wintery scene, or seascape are considered as a totality. Seals, often done through a telescope, were shown as they were sun-bathing on rocks, yawning, calling their offspring, unaware of being captured from distant rocks. Butterflies became his main work in later years, developing his skills at observing and putting down on paper the shape, pattern and vibrant colour of these exquisite fragile yet robust creatures, often stalking them with unbelievable smooth balance so as not to disturb them, with absolute dedication. "Patience" was his motto — in life as well as art ! Christine Measures 04.09.2011 IMAGE GALLERY 1 ONLINE BOOKS Quoting from Julian Spalding's obituary in the Guardian, "David lives in every flick of his brush, finger-tip, colour loaded nail!" David's sketches and paintings are his response to what he sees, and experiences, and those of the creatures he happens to see by chance, or those he sets out to see. His note-books / sketch-books, are full of drawings and written notes as a result of his quest to know more about the creatures, the wild-life, wherever he went. But to be able to achieve this he followed and observed his creatures as he went about his daily life, therefore returning to the same spot time and time again. In this he was not interested in making "a painting" — wildlife moves, so his drawings are often gestural marks — maybe half a head, twitching ears of a hare, a beady eye looking at him, but always full of the character of the bird, animal, insect. Speed and accuracy of seeing and drawing are the essence of the activity. Whereas his watercolours of Derbyshire woodland in the sunset, hazy wintery scene, or seascape are considered as a totality. Seals, often done through a telescope, were shown as they were sun-bathing on rocks, yawning, calling their offspring, unaware of being captured from distant rocks. Butterflies became his main work in later years, developing his skills at observing and putting down on paper the shape, pattern and vibrant colour of these exquisite fragile yet robust creatures, often stalking them with unbelievable smooth balance so as not to disturb them, with absolute dedication. "Patience" was his motto — in life as well as art !

Christine Measures 04.09.2011